Mathematics - what does mathematics look like at Pilgrim? 

 

We teach the Mathematics National Curriculum, which ensures that the children are fluent in the fundamentals and have conceptual understanding so that they can reason mathematically. The intent of our curriculum is to allow children to flourish with their knowledge and understanding in mathematics throughout their school life, enriching their passion and enthusiasm for this subject. We believe giving all children a secure knowledge base will enable fluency across maths, science and technology, allowing them to be financially equipped for everyday life.

 

We teach a mastery curriculum - what does that mean? 
The Mastery learning model forms the basis of our approach to teaching maths. This means spending greater time going in to depth about a subject as opposed to racing through the concepts and knowledge pupils are expected to know by the end of each year group. Accelerating through content can lead to some children having large gaps in their knowledge because the concept is either too big or learnt too quickly. As a primary school, it is our duty to ensure that children have an absolutely solid, concrete understanding of subject
knowledge and skills as well as being emotionally resilient for the next year of their education. Our intention is to take learning at a measured pace. This will better ensure no child is left behind as well as providing deeper and richer experiences for children who are grasping
ideas quickly. Evidence shows that children need to be able to understand a concept, apply it in a range of situations and then be creative with it to really understand (or master) it. Simply going beyond the requirements of their age group does not guarantee they have fully
understood something – just that they have heard it. At our school, the majority of children will be taught the content from their year group only. They will spend time becoming true masters of content, applying and being creative with
new knowledge in multiple ways.

 

World Mathematics Day

To celebrate World Maths Day we invited in all of the parents in to celebrate how we do maths at The Pilgrim School. We showed them some great top tips, new games and even how to use TTRockstars - our new favorite game. Check out some of the photos below: 

Pilgrim Progress - The journey of mathematics at Pilgrim School - what knowledge should I have by the end of each year group? 

The Pilgrim Progress is a system we have created for the assessment of all subjects in year groups one to six. This system ensures effective tracking of progress and coverage of the Curriculum throughout these two key stages. The Pilgrim Progress will show you the expected outcomes for each year group (what they should know by the end of the year). 

 

Find your child's Pilgrim Progress below:

Name
 Year 1 maths.pdfDownload
 Year 2 maths.pdfDownload
 Year 3 maths.pdfDownload
 Year 4 maths.pdfDownload
 Year 5 maths.pdfDownload
 Year 6 maths.pdfDownload
Showing 1-6 of 6

What does The pilgrim progress look like in school? 

In-school formative assessment is the ongoing, day-to-day assessment which is carried out by adults and children. This assessment takes a variety of forms:

The Pilgrim Progress is a system we have created for the assessment of all subjects
in year groups one to six. This system ensures effective tracking of progress and
coverage of the Curriculum throughout these two key stages. 

Lessons are planned using the ‘review, teach, practice, apply’ structure.
 

Understanding is assessed during a review activity to enable teachers to respond
accurately to the learning needs of their class.

Verbal and written feedback is given so that children know how to improve their work
and are aware of their next steps of learning

Mathematics Policy

Times Tables Rockstars

At Pilgrim School we love playing Times Tables Rockstars.

In either paper form or online, Times Tables Rock Stars is a carefully sequenced programme of daily times tables practice. Each week concentrates on a different times table, with a recommended consolidation week for rehearsing the tables that have recently been practised every third week or so. This format has very successfully boosted times tables recall speed for hundreds of thousands of pupils over the last 8 years in over 14,000 schools - both primary and secondary - worldwide.

 

How quick should I be at my times tables? 

Year 1/2 - Children are just starting to begin their times tables journey - there should be no pressure on time but enjoy learning new facts! 

 

Year 3 - Children be should starting to become familiar with their times tables facts and by the end of the year should be able to answer questions within 5 seconds. 

 

Year 4 - By the end of year 4 children should be fluent with their times tables facts. They should be able to answer any question within 3 seconds. 

 

Year 5 - Children should now be trying to improve their time - they should be able to answer any question within 2.8 seconds.

 

Year 6 - Children should now be trying to improve their time - they should be able to answer any question within 2.7 seconds.

 

 

 

Times Tables Rockstars Leaderboard - Can you make it to the top?

At The Pilgrim School we love reading about mathematics too.. 

Here our some of our recommendations: